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Redefining Storytelling for Well Told

Redefining Storytelling for Well Told

Mission

After ten years in business, Uncommon Green were looking to rebrand with a new name and strategy. Building on their mission to create something that truly reflects what they do - creating uniquely personal goods that help tell their customer's greatest stories.
My mission was to help them create a visual identity system that harmonised with their new name and brand vision.

After ten years in business, Uncommon Green were looking to rebrand with a new name and strategy. Building on their mission to create something that truly reflects what they do - creating uniquely personal goods that help tell their customer's greatest stories. My mission was to help them create a visual identity system that harmonised with their new name and brand vision.

After ten years in business, Uncommon Green were looking to rebrand with a new name and strategy. Building on their mission to create something that truly reflects what they do - creating uniquely personal goods that help tell their customer's greatest stories. My mission was to help them create a visual identity system that harmonised with their new name and brand vision.

After ten years in business, Uncommon Green were looking to rebrand with a new name and strategy. Building on their mission to create something that truly reflects what they do - creating uniquely personal goods that help tell their customer's greatest stories.

My mission was to help them create a visual identity system that harmonised with their new name and brand vision.

Outcome

Outcome

I designed the new Well Told visual identity from the ground up. Capturing their story in a new logo and packaging suite.

Helping Well Told provide a more meaningful experience to their customers and give them confidence to move forward with their rebrand.

I designed the new Well Told visual identity from the ground up. Capturing their story in a new logo and packaging suite. Helping Well Told provide a more meaningful experience to their customers and give them confidence to move forward with their rebrand.

Impact

Since working with Well Told, their rebrand and new visual identity has been met with an exceptionally positive response from customers.

They are also in the process of expanding internationally, leading with a stronger focus on story telling than ever before.

Since working with Well Told, their rebrand and new visual identity has been met with an exceptionally positive response from customers. They are also in the process of expanding internationally, leading with a stronger focus on story telling than ever before.

Services

Services

Logo Design
Brand Design
Packaging

Logo Design
Brand Design
Packaging

Logo Design, Brand Design & Packaging

Logo Design, Brand Design & Packaging

WellTold_During_Sales_001

Some of the Well Told team - Neil, Dave, Brian & Colin (left to right).

Some of the Well Told team - Neil, Dave, Brian & Colin (left to right).

Some of the Well Told team - Neil, Dave, Brian & Colin (left to right).

Some of the Well Told team - Neil, Dave, Brian & Colin (left to right).

Some of the Well Told team - Neil, Dave, Brian & Colin (left to right).

The Prologue

The Prologue

Well Told began life in 2009 as Uncommon Green - a custom homeware and décor company founded in Boston and the passion project of Brian Johnson. Uncommon Green wanted to create products that went beyond functionality and style, employing unique materials and design content to create a truly unique experience for every customer. Since 2009, they have been creating ultra-personalised products that leave customers feeling inspired and ready for adventure.

The combination of tasteful modern aesthetic with personally meaningful design led Brian's passion-project to grow quickly into a business that is now celebrating its 10th year.

As the business has grown it became clear that a large portion of their customers were gifting products to others rather than using them themselves, giving this project a unique perspective overall. Not only did we have to create design work that inspired the purchasing customer but also the receiving party as well.

Well Told began life in 2009 as Uncommon Green - a custom homeware and décor company founded in Boston and the passion project of Brian Johnson.

Uncommon Green wanted to create products that went beyond functionality and style, employing unique materials and design content to create a truly unique experience for every customer. Since 2009, they have been creating ultra-personalised products that leave customers feeling inspired and ready for adventure.

The combination of tasteful modern aesthetic with personally meaningful design led Brian's passion-project to grow quickly into a business that is now celebrating its 10th year.

As the business has grown it became clear that a large portion of their customers were gifting products to others rather than using them themselves, giving this project a unique perspective overall. Not only did we have to create design work that inspired the purchasing customer but also the receiving party as well.

Well Told began life in 2009 as Uncommon Green - a custom homeware and décor company founded in Boston and the passion project of Brian Johnson. Uncommon Green wanted to create products that went beyond functionality and style, employing unique materials and design content to create a truly unique experience for every customer.

Since 2009, they have been creating ultra-personalised products that leave customers feeling inspired and ready for adventure.

The combination of tasteful modern aesthetic with personally meaningful design led Brian's passion-project to grow quickly into a business that is now celebrating its 10th year.

As the business has grown it became clear that a large portion of their customers were gifting products to others rather than using them themselves, giving this project a unique perspective overall. Not only did we have to create design work that inspired the purchasing customer but also the receiving party as well.

Well Told began life in 2009 as Uncommon Green - a custom homeware and décor company founded in Boston and the passion project of Brian Johnson.

Uncommon Green wanted to create products that went beyond functionality and style, employing unique materials and design content to create a truly unique experience for every customer.

Since 2009, they have been creating ultra-personalised products that leave customers feeling inspired and ready for adventure.

The combination of tasteful modern aesthetic with personally meaningful design led Brian's passion-project to grow quickly into a business that is now celebrating its 10th year.

As the business has grown it became clear that a large portion of their customers were gifting products to others rather than using them themselves, giving this project a unique perspective overall.

Not only did we have to create design work that inspired the purchasing customer but also the receiving party as well.

WellTold_During_Sales_009
WellTold_During_Sales_012

Turning Point

In the past year Brian and his team began to realise the name, Uncommon Green, was no longer going to fit their "life-inspired" business model and strategy. Whilst the products and high-quality manufacturing methods remain consistent to this day, their ethos has grown and developed over time, which lead them to the idea of rebranding themselves. That's when they contacted me.

During our initial discussions, Uncommon Green was going through a brand repositioning exercise, creating a new name and strategy for their business that reflected their updated values and mission - "to create unique, beautifully made goods that not only tell your story, they become part of it.". We began discussions into creating a new logo design for their business using it as a catalyst with their new strategy to launch the rebrand.

They were looking for a solution to a problem that was two-fold. Internally the team felt there was a misalignment between the name Uncommon Green, their current visual identity and the true essence of what they do. Externally their customers had a disconnect between the brand name, message and products.

This disconnect could have ultimately caused confusion for their customers, a problem no expanding business wants to have. Whilst this disconnect could be partially addressed in their new strategy effort, they needed to have a new updated visual identity to work from moving forward. The messages they wanted to project needed to be aligned to create room for their new vision to shine through.

In the past year Brian and his team began to realise the name, Uncommon Green, was no longer going to fit their "life-inspired" business model and strategy. Whilst the products and high-quality manufacturing methods remain consistent to this day, their ethos has grown and developed over time, which lead them to the idea of rebranding themselves. That's when they contacted me.

During our initial discussions, Uncommon Green was going through a brand repositioning exercise, creating a new name and strategy for their business that reflected their updated values and mission - "to create unique, beautifully made goods that not only tell your story, they become part of it."

We began discussions into creating a new logo design for their business using it as a catalyst with their new strategy to launch the rebrand.

They were looking for a solution to a problem that was two-fold. Internally the team felt there was a misalignment between the name Uncommon Green, their current visual identity and the true essence of what they do. Externally their customers had a disconnect between the brand name, message and products.

This disconnect could have ultimately caused confusion for their customers, a problem no expanding business wants to have. Whilst this disconnect could be partially addressed in their new strategy effort, they needed to have a new updated visual identity to work from moving forward. The messages they wanted to project needed to be aligned to create room for their new vision to shine through.

In the past year Brian and his team began to realise the name, Uncommon Green, was no longer going to fit their "life-inspired" business model and strategy.

Whilst the products and high-quality manufacturing methods remain consistent to this day, their ethos has grown and developed over time, which lead them to the idea of rebranding themselves. That's when they contacted me.

During our initial discussions, Uncommon Green was going through a brand repositioning exercise, creating a new name and strategy for their business that reflected their updated values and mission - "to create unique, beautifully made goods that not only tell your story, they become part of it."

We began discussions into creating a new logo design for their business using it as a catalyst with their new strategy to launch the rebrand.

They were looking for a solution to a problem that was two-fold. Internally the team felt there was a misalignment between the name Uncommon Green, their current visual identity and the true essence of what they do. Externally their customers had a disconnect between the brand name, message and products.

This disconnect could have ultimately caused confusion for their customers, a problem no expanding business wants to have. Whilst this disconnect could be partially addressed in their new strategy effort, they needed to have a new updated visual identity to work from moving forward.

The messages they wanted to project needed to be aligned to create room for their new vision to shine through.

WellTold_During_Sales_007

Digging Deeper

We began our process by reviewing the new brand strategy they had created and assessing the challenges they faced up to this point. Breaking down each individual problem to its core to help us align their messaging and make sure we were all on the same page. We needed to create designs that balanced their vision with customer expectations and the user experience every customer had when gifting or receiving a product.

To aid in this discovery session we constructed a selection of user profiles to help identify the exact problems and potential solutions each customer type was facing when interacting with their brand. One of the big distinctions between these users was that some customers purely bought products for other people and got great satisfaction from it but, never purchased anything for themselves.

We discovered those customers who bought gifts often needed a more meaningful experience than if they were just buying a product for themselves. Their personal reputation was on the line every time they handed over a gift so, we had to make sure the new design work not only enhanced the user experience but also resonated strongly with customers who were gifting products.

We began our process by reviewing the new brand strategy they had created and assessing the challenges they faced up to this point. Breaking down each individual problem to its core to help us align their messaging and make sure we were all on the same page.

We needed to create designs that balanced their vision with customer expectations and the user experience every customer had when gifting or receiving a product.

To aid in this discovery session we constructed a selection of user profiles to help identify the exact problems and potential solutions each customer type was facing when interacting with their brand.

One of the big distinctions between these users was that some customers purely bought products for other people and got great satisfaction from it but, never purchased anything for themselves.

We discovered those customers who bought gifts often needed a more meaningful experience than if they were just buying a product for themselves. Their personal reputation was on the line every time they handed over a gift so, we had to make sure the new design work not only enhanced the user experience but also resonated strongly with customers who were gifting products.

We began our process by reviewing the new brand strategy they had created and assessing the challenges they faced up to this point. Breaking down each individual problem to its core to help us align their messaging and make sure we were all on the same page.

We needed to create designs that balanced their vision with customer expectations and the user experience every customer had when gifting or receiving a product.

To aid in this discovery session we constructed a selection of user profiles to help identify the exact problems and potential solutions each customer type was facing when interacting with their brand.

One of the big distinctions between these users was that some customers purely bought products for other people and got great satisfaction from it but, never purchased anything for themselves.

We discovered those customers who bought gifts often needed a more meaningful experience than if they were just buying a product for themselves.

Their personal reputation was on the line every time they handed over a gift so, we had to make sure the new design work not only enhanced the user experience but also resonated strongly with customers who were gifting products.

Well Told user profile statements created for their logo design and rebrand project with cfowlerdesign

Cementing an Art Direction

The brand guide and user profiles gave us a core foundation to work from, taking keywords from the guidelines and information gathered during the user profiles stage to compile a series of moodboards that reflected the brands grander vision. I used a system I call the "cool, medium and hot method" to encapsulate three different art directions that would be effective for the Well Told brand.

This technique is a precursor to creating stylescapes so I can more easily find images on a large scale before narrowing down the most appropriate imagery for each art direction.

Once the moodboards were complete I began to siphon images into individual stylescapes, creating three very different art directions. The first being very lighthearted, more feminine and muted in colour. Playing off of the romantic idea of travelling, road trips and campfire stories. The second was very urban, appealing to the dreaming adventurer rather than the weekend hiker. Someone who loves the idea of travelling but also loves the urban "concrete jungle" lifestyle.

Then finally the third stylescape was pitched towards enticing the adventurous traveller, showcasing natural colours, imagery and bold typefaces. We settled on the third stylescape as it resonated the most with Well Told's brand message of being "life-inspired" and finding natural inspiration in the world around you.

Stylescapes are a powerful tool in creating an art direction for any design project. Not only do they help guide the process but, in the case of this project Well Told pointed out several ideas in each stylescape that could be applied to the main direction, creating a more collaborative process overall. Each stylescape tells a story and gave us the tools to create designs that reflect the business' exact requirements and goals.

The brand guide and user profiles gave us a core foundation to work from, taking keywords from the guidelines and information gathered during the user profiles stage to compile a series of moodboards that reflected the brands grander vision. I used a system I call the "cool, medium and hot method" to encapsulate three different art directions that would be effective for the Well Told brand.

This technique is a precursor to creating stylescapes so I can more easily find images on a large scale before narrowing down the most appropriate imagery for each art direction.

Once the moodboards were complete I began to siphon images into individual stylescapes, creating three very different art directions. The first being very lighthearted, more feminine and muted in colour. Playing off of the romantic idea of travelling, road trips and campfire stories.

The second was very urban, appealing to the dreaming adventurer rather than the weekend hiker. Someone who loves the idea of travelling but also loves the urban "concrete jungle" lifestyle.

Then finally the third stylescape was pitched towards enticing the adventurous traveller, showcasing natural colours, imagery and bold typefaces. We settled on the third stylescape as it resonated the most with Well Told's brand message of being "life-inspired" and finding natural inspiration in the world around you.

Stylescapes are a powerful tool in creating an art direction for any design project. Not only do they help guide the process but, in the case of this project Well Told pointed out several ideas in each stylescape that could be applied to the main direction, creating a more collaborative process overall

Each stylescape tells a story and gave us the tools to create designs that reflect the business' exact requirements and goals.

The brand guide and user profiles gave us a core foundation to work from, taking keywords from the guidelines and information gathered during the user profiles stage to compile a series of moodboards that reflected the brands grander vision.

I used a system I call the "cool, medium and hot method" to encapsulate three different art directions that would be effective for the Well Told brand.

This technique is a precursor to creating stylescapes so I can more easily find images on a large scale before narrowing down the most appropriate imagery for each art direction.

Once the moodboards were complete I began to siphon images into individual stylescapes, creating three very different art directions. The first being very lighthearted, more feminine and muted in colour. Playing off of the romantic idea of travelling, road trips and campfire stories.

The second was very urban, appealing to the dreaming adventurer rather than the weekend hiker. Someone who loves the idea of travelling but also loves the urban "concrete jungle" lifestyle.

Then finally the third stylescape was pitched towards enticing the adventurous traveller, showcasing natural colours, imagery and bold typefaces. We settled on the third stylescape as it resonated the most with Well Told's brand message of being "life-inspired" and finding natural inspiration in the world around you.

Stylescapes are a powerful tool in creating an art direction for any design project. Not only do they help guide the process but, in the case of this project Well Told pointed out several ideas in each stylescape that could be applied to the main direction, creating a more collaborative process overall.

Each stylescape tells a story and gave us the tools to create designs that reflect the business' exact requirements and goals.

Pencil to Paper

Once the art direction had been selected it gave us a much narrower road to design within. Which is more of a blessing than a curse. Because we went for the more adventure-focused art direction I begin creating concepts that felt natural, compelling and inspiring through hand-drawn motion and simple geometry.

It was at this stage I began sketching different ideas. The hardest part of this stage was making sure the design would be suitable for all of Well Told's product applications. This included ink printing and laser etching techniques on a variety of materials such as glass, metal and wood.

These application techniques, and how they might effect the clarity of the logo design, were constantly at the forefront of my mind during this process. When working with an existing company you have to work alongside and in harmony with their current manufacturing methods to guarantee what you create is actually replicable across all of their products.

As the pages of sketching went on I was drawn to the idea of using one stroke for the design. Drawing on the personal connection each customer had with their product and creating a design that could be drawn by anyone, each time being every so slightly different. This style drew your attention into the mark due to its unusual shape and naturalistic approach, which I felt would appeal to both adventurous and urban dwelling customers.

Once the art direction had been selected it gave us a much narrower road to design within.

Because we went for the more adventure-focused art direction I begin creating concepts that felt natural, compelling and inspiring through hand-drawn motion and simple geometry.

It was at this stage I began sketching different ideas. The hardest part of this stage was making sure the design would be suitable for all of Well Told's product applications. This included ink printing and laser etching techniques on a variety of materials such as glass, metal and wood.

These application techniques, and how they might effect the clarity of the logo design, were constantly at the forefront of my mind during this process.

When working with an existing company you have to work alongside and in harmony with their current manufacturing methods to guarantee what you create is actually replicable across all of their products.

As the pages of sketching went on I was drawn to the idea of using one stroke for the design. Drawing on the personal connection each customer had with their product and creating a design that could be drawn by anyone, each time being every so slightly different.

This style drew your attention into the mark due to its unusual shape and naturalistic approach, which I felt would appeal to both adventurous and urban dwelling customers.

Well_Told_Creation_013
Well_Told_Creation_014

Going Digital

Going Digital

I began to run with this idea in a few different layouts, creating mockups, presentations, applications and colour palettes. Testing each concept against a multitude of different ideas and then narrowing it down to the best solution. When it came to testing each of these concepts with a colour palette I made sure we explored all angles of the spectrum we'd chosen.

Whilst our original stylescape had quite bright tones, Well Told also enjoyed the more muted tones of the first stylescape which lead me to test a wider selection of bright and muted tones to establish the best colours for the job. Whilst it is unlikely that the colour palette we selected would be used on every product directly, it still needed to be considered for every other part of their branding from packaging to newsletter banners and beyond.

We already had our main typeface for this project but, a secondary needed to be selected to complete the set for both display and body copy. Unfortunately, Posterama, Well Told's main typeface, is unavailable in lower case characters making it impossible to use throughout the entire brand system.

However, after some testing, it became clear that Cera Pro would be a good balance for Posterama mirroring it almost perfectly. The letterforms between the two are quite similar and Cera is designed more for long-form reading, making this a perfect pair to move forward with.

I began to run with this idea in a few different layouts, creating mockups, presentations, applications and colour palettes.

Testing each concept against a multitude of different ideas and then narrowing it down to the best solution. When it came to testing each of these concepts with a colour palette I made sure we explored all angles of the spectrum we'd chosen.

Whilst our original stylescape had quite bright tones, Well Told also enjoyed the more muted tones of the first stylescape which lead me to test a wider selection of bright and muted tones to establish the best colours for the job.

It was unlikely that the colour palette we selected would be used on every product directly, it still needed to be considered for every other part of their branding from packaging to newsletter banners and beyond.

We already had our main typeface for this project but, a secondary needed to be selected to complete the set for both display and body copy. Unfortunately, Posterama, Well Told's main typeface, is unavailable in lower case characters making it impossible to use throughout the entire brand system.

However, after some testing, it became clear that Cera Pro would be a good balance for Posterama mirroring it almost perfectly. The letterforms between the two are quite similar and Cera is designed more for long-form reading, making this a perfect pair to move forward with.

WellTold_Screenshot_002
WellTold_Screenshot_001
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A Bump in the Road

A Bump in the Road

During the first presentation the initial logo concept was received well, the packaging and mockups were clear and it appeared to tick all of the boxes. Both the client and I were happy to move forward to the next stage. I was sure this would be the best solution for them. But, and here it comes, the big but, about a week later...

I woke up in the middle of the night and realised that the logo we selected was not the right one for their brand.

A very eureka (or mad scientist) moment I know but, ultimately this thought would change the whole direction of the project for the better. My goals are always to make sure my client gets the most valuable solution for their business so, I had to make this decision.

During the first presentation the initial logo concept was received well, the packaging and mockups were clear and it appeared to tick all of the boxes. Both the client and I were happy to move forward to the next stage. I was sure this would be the best solution for them. But, and here it comes, the big but, about a week later...

I woke up in the middle of the night and realised that the logo we selected was not the right one for their brand.

A very eureka (or mad scientist) moment I know but, ultimately this thought would change the whole direction of the project for the better.

My goals are always to make sure my client gets the most valuable solution for their business so, I had to make this decision.

WellTold_Screenshot_008

Taking a Risk

Because I knew there was a problem, it was my duty as a professional to make sure it was resolved before presenting it back to Well Told. I did not want to burden them with a decision I made a mistake on. It would also have been unprofessional to push this thought under the rug and continue on with an ineffective and inappropriate logo design. Whilst it took me a considerable amount of time and work to figure out which the best solution actually was, it was ultimately worth it.

I spent days digging out my sketchbook, reviewing my process, seeing how we got to where we were and then analysing every potential solution in application. Referring back to the exact list of requirements we had to meet for the brand strategy, product applications and conversations we previously had. I was aiming to find the design that would fit perfectly in the centre of our venn diagram rather than just outside it.

I created a version 1.5 presentation that showcased my alternative solution and the reasons why what I had previously created didn't match up to the goals we had in mind. I poured my heart into that presentation, working through every single problem I had come up against and every single idea that did not quite fit with the vision Well Told had. Addressing every problem and presenting a more effective solution.

Because I knew there was a problem, it was my duty as a professional to make sure it was resolved before presenting it back to Well Told. I did not want to burden them with a decision I made a mistake on. It would also have been unprofessional to push this thought under the rug and continue on with an ineffective and inappropriate logo design.

Whilst it took me a considerable amount of time and work to figure out which the best solution actually was, it was ultimately worth it.

I spent days digging out my sketchbook, reviewing my process, seeing how we got to where we were and then analysing every potential solution in application. Referring back to the exact list of requirements we had to meet for the brand strategy, product applications and conversations we previously had.

I was aiming to find the design that would fit perfectly in the centre of our venn diagram rather than just outside it.

I created a version 1.5 presentation that showcased my alternative solution and the reasons why what I had previously created didn't match up to the goals we had in mind. I poured my heart into that presentation, working through every single problem I had come up against and every single idea that did not quite fit with the vision Well Told had. Addressing every problem and presenting a more effective solution.

Because I knew there was a problem, it was my duty as a professional to make sure it was resolved before presenting it back to Well Told. I did not want to burden them with a decision I made a mistake on. It would also have been unprofessional to push this thought under the rug and continue on with an ineffective and inappropriate logo design.

Whilst it took me a considerable amount of time and work to figure out which the best solution actually was, it was ultimately worth it.

I spent days digging out my sketchbook, reviewing my process, seeing how we got to where we were and then analysing every potential solution in application. Referring back to the exact list of requirements we had to meet for the brand strategy, product applications and conversations we previously had.

I was aiming to find the design that would fit perfectly in the centre of our venn diagram rather than just outside it.

I created a version 1.5 presentation that showcased my alternative solution and the reasons why what I had previously created didn't match up to the goals we had in mind. I poured my heart into that presentation, working through every single problem I had come up against and every single idea that did not quite fit with the vision Well Told had. Addressing every problem and presenting a more effective solution.

WellTold_Whiskey_001
WellTold_Business_Card_002_B
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Two_Water_Bottles_v7

The Next Level

After I had finished presenting this 1.5 presentation, I sat patiently, expecting the project to be terminated at that moment. However, it appeared that my hesitant thoughts and feelings towards the original design were also shared with my client. They were also initially hesitant at the mountain/triangle shaped design but, trusted my expertise as a professional to help them find the best logo for their business.

Although I initially let them down, I felt relieved that they not only shared my hesitation with the first design but that they were excited by my reasoning for selecting a new one. At the end of that call, I took a very deep breath because not only had we made the right choice but, I had proven that honesty in business is what matters the most. Transparency and honesty are the most important skills between business partnerships no matter how much money or effort has been put into a project already. There was no point in hiding the truth.

The second design I created was selected as the main concept right away and we were ready to continue forward with the project. Unlike the initial concept, we now had a solution that worked in every application and one that brought together all of the key characteristics we discussed during our research phase.

Elements of adventure, inspiration and passion were all present within one symbol.

Not only was this new mark a better solution for the brand itself but, it also allowed us to build out a more structured and wider identity system. Using a variety of lockups, patterns and badge designs to give each product a distinct look and feel for customers. Providing them with a unique experience and sense of discovery at every point in the buying cycle.

The final design captured all of the key characteristics and initial research we gathered at the beginning of the project into one symbol. Bringing together meaningful design and functional products that could be used every day.

The logo uses a combination of typographic and abstract elements to give the design a sense of adventure and storytelling, a reflection of the Well Told brand itself. Seamlessly blending in with your everyday life and becoming a part of your stories.

After I had finished presenting this 1.5 presentation, I sat patiently, expecting the project to be terminated at that moment. However, it appeared that my hesitant thoughts and feelings towards the original design were also shared with my client. They were also initially hesitant at the mountain/triangle shaped design but, trusted my expertise as a professional to help them find the best logo for their business.

Although I initially let them down, I felt relieved that they not only shared my hesitation with the first design but that they were excited by my reasoning for selecting a new one. At the end of that call, I took a very deep breath because not only had we made the right choice but, I had proven that honesty in business is what matters the most.

Transparency and honesty are the most important skills between business partnerships no matter how much money or effort has been put into a project already. There was no point in hiding the truth.

The second design I created was selected as the main concept right away and we were ready to continue forward with the project. Unlike the initial concept, we now had a solution that worked in every application and one that brought together all of the key characteristics we discussed during our research phase.

Elements of adventure, inspiration and passion were all present within one symbol.

Not only was this new mark a better solution for the brand itself but, it also allowed us to build out a more structured and wider identity system. Using a variety of lockups, patterns and badge designs to give each product a distinct look and feel for customers. Providing them with a unique experience and sense of discovery at every point in the buying cycle.

The final design captured all of the key characteristics and initial research we gathered at the beginning of the project into one symbol. Bringing together meaningful design and functional products that could be used every day.

The logo uses a combination of typographic and abstract elements to give the design a sense of adventure and storytelling, a reflection of the Well Told brand itself. Seamlessly blending in with your everyday life and becoming a part of your stories.

After I had finished presenting this 1.5 presentation, I sat patiently, expecting the project to be terminated at that moment. However, it appeared that my hesitant thoughts and feelings towards the original design were also shared with my client. They were also initially hesitant at the mountain/triangle shaped design but, trusted my expertise as a professional to help them find the best logo for their business.

Although I initially let them down, I felt relieved that they not only shared my hesitation with the first design but that they were excited by my reasoning for selecting a new one. At the end of that call, I took a very deep breath because not only had we made the right choice but, I had proven that honesty in business is what matters the most.

Transparency and honesty are the most important skills between business partnerships no matter how much money or effort has been put into a project already. There was no point in hiding the truth.

The second design I created was selected as the main concept right away and we were ready to continue forward with the project. Unlike the initial concept, we now had a solution that worked in every application and one that brought together all of the key characteristics we discussed during our research phase.

Elements of adventure, inspiration and passion were all present within one symbol.

Not only was this new mark a better solution for the brand itself but, it also allowed us to build out a more structured and wider identity system. Using a variety of lockups, patterns and badge designs to give each product a distinct look and feel for customers. Providing them with a unique experience and sense of discovery at every point in the buying cycle.

The final design captured all of the key characteristics and initial research we gathered at the beginning of the project into one symbol. Bringing together meaningful design and functional products that could be used every day.

The logo uses a combination of typographic and abstract elements to give the design a sense of adventure and storytelling, a reflection of the Well Told brand itself. Seamlessly blending in with your everyday life and becoming a part of your stories.

After I had finished presenting this 1.5 presentation, I sat patiently, expecting the project to be terminated at that moment. However, it appeared that my hesitant thoughts and feelings towards the original design were also shared with my client.

They were also initially hesitant at the mountain/triangle shaped design but, trusted my expertise as a professional to help them find the best logo for their business.

Although I initially let them down, I felt relieved that they not only shared my hesitation with the first design but that they were excited by my reasoning for selecting a new one. At the end of that call, I took a very deep breath because not only had we made the right choice but, I had proven that honesty in business is what matters the most.

Transparency and honesty are the most important skills between business partnerships no matter how much money or effort has been put into a project already. There was no point in hiding the truth.

The second design I created was selected as the main concept right away and we were ready to continue forward with the project. Unlike the initial concept, we now had a solution that worked in every application and one that brought together all of the key characteristics we discussed during our research phase.

Elements of adventure, inspiration and passion were all present within one symbol.

Not only was this new mark a better solution for the brand itself but, it also allowed us to build out a more structured and wider identity system. Using a variety of lockups, patterns and badge designs to give each product a distinct look and feel for customers. Providing them with a unique experience and sense of discovery at every point in the buying cycle.

The final design captured all of the key characteristics and initial research we gathered at the beginning of the project into one symbol. Bringing together meaningful design and functional products that could be used every day.

The logo uses a combination of typographic and abstract elements to give the design a sense of adventure and storytelling, a reflection of the Well Told brand itself. Seamlessly blending in with your everyday life and becoming a part of your stories.

Well_Told_Lockup

Being Truly Life-Inspired

Life can be challenging but, sometimes we need to take a moment to sit back and be present. Reflecting on what we have and all of the great experiences we've had along the way.

This was the attitude I wanted to connect customers with when creating this logo. Being "life-inspired" doesn't always mean chasing the hardest or most complex thing but, it can also mean reminiscing and noticing the small things in life that make you feel content as well.

These are the emotions this logo aims to evoke in every customer when they come into contact with Well Told's brand.

Lock_Banner_3

Going Beyond a Logo

The new logo design has been rolled out over the last few months and was one of the major turning points for Well Told's brand transition from Uncommon Green. As the new logo design was being integrated into their website we began to create a new suite of packaging that reflected their updated strategy and visual identity as well.

The packaging design process for this project was quite unusual, due to the nature of each box and also the materials each piece of packaging was made from. Depending on the product location, whether that was in a brick and mortar store or online, each one needed a slightly different approach. However, because we had spent considerable time refining Well Told's visual identity we were able to build a design system that worked flawlessly across all of their products.

By unifying the system around specific copy, layouts and icons we were able to create a series of packaging that worked across both eCommerce and brick and mortar sales points. From single rocks glass boxes all the way up to large shipping boxes, the designs were flexible and gave Well Told creative freedom to share their message and showcase the beauty of their products.

It's always a nerve-racking time launching a new visual identity but, once we started to apply it to packaging, seeing it in action, it became clear we had made the right decision. Every step of the way this new design was outperforming our initial expectations and was quickly growing on every member of Well Told's team.

The new logo design has been rolled out over the last few months and was one of the major turning points for Well Told's brand transition from Uncommon Green. As the new logo design was being integrated into their website we began to create a new suite of packaging that reflected their updated strategy and visual identity as well.

The packaging design process for this project was quite unusual, due to the nature of each box and also the materials each piece of packaging was made from. Depending on the product location, whether that was in a brick and mortar store or online, each one needed a slightly different approach.

However, because we had spent considerable time refining Well Told's visual identity we were able to build a design system that worked flawlessly across all of their products.

By unifying the system around specific copy, layouts and icons we were able to create a series of packaging that worked across both eCommerce and brick and mortar sales points.

From single rocks glass boxes all the way up to large shipping boxes, the designs were flexible and gave Well Told creative freedom to share their message and showcase the beauty of their products.

It's always a nerve-racking time launching a new visual identity but, once we started to apply it to packaging, seeing it in action, it became clear we had made the right decision. Every step of the way this new design was outperforming our initial expectations and was quickly growing on every member of Well Told's team.

The new logo design has been rolled out over the last few months and was one of the major turning points for Well Told's brand transition from Uncommon Green. As the new logo design was being integrated into their website we began to create a new suite of packaging that reflected their updated strategy and visual identity as well.

The packaging design process for this project was quite unusual, due to the nature of each box and also the materials each piece of packaging was made from. Depending on the product location, whether that was in a brick and mortar store or online, each one needed a slightly different approach.

However, because we had spent considerable time refining Well Told's visual identity we were able to build a design system that worked flawlessly across all of their products.

By unifying the system around specific copy, layouts and icons we were able to create a series of packaging that worked across both eCommerce and brick and mortar sales points. From single rocks glass boxes all the way up to large shipping boxes, the designs were flexible and gave Well Told creative freedom to share their message and showcase the beauty of their products.

It's always a nerve-racking time launching a new visual identity but, once we started to apply it to packaging, seeing it in action, it became clear we had made the right decision. Every step of the way this new design was outperforming our initial expectations and was quickly growing on every member of Well Told's team.

The new logo design has been rolled out over the last few months and was one of the major turning points for Well Told's brand transition from Uncommon Green.

As the new logo design was being integrated into their website we began to create a new suite of packaging that reflected their updated strategy and visual identity as well.

The packaging design process for this project was quite unusual, due to the nature of each box and also the materials each piece of packaging was made from. Depending on the product location, whether that was in a brick and mortar store or online, each one needed a slightly different approach.

However, because we had spent considerable time refining Well Told's visual identity we were able to build a design system that worked flawlessly across all of their products.

By unifying the system around specific copy, layouts and icons we were able to create a series of packaging that worked across both eCommerce and brick and mortar sales points. From single rocks glass boxes all the way up to large shipping boxes, the designs were flexible and gave Well Told creative freedom to share their message and showcase the beauty of their products.

It's always a nerve-racking time launching a new visual identity but, once we started to apply it to packaging, seeing it in action, it became clear we had made the right decision.

Every step of the way this new design was outperforming our initial expectations and was quickly growing on every member of Well Told's team.

WellTold_Shipping_Box_002
WellTold_Shipping_Box_001
WellTold_Packing_Tape_002
WellTold_Business_Card_001_D

Well Told's New Story

Well Told's New Story

Since creating a new logo design and packaging solutions for Well Told they have announced their rebrand to the world and launched their new website to many excited responses. As the transition towards new packaging continues we will be able to see the reaction of their users fully but, the initial reaction has been very positive so far.

Well Told's brand strategy and visual identity now align giving them the ability to move forward with confidence. A rebrand is a massive undertaking and can be very stressful but, once we finished collaborating and saw the positive impact the new logo design was having it became very clear the direction we took was the best for their brand.

Their visual identity now truly embodies the idea of being "life-inspired".

With designs that reflect their passion and creativity for making exceptionally meaningful goods that allow you to tell your story.

Since creating a new logo design and packaging solutions for Well Told they have announced their rebrand to the world and launched their new website to many excited responses.

As the transition towards new packaging continues we will be able to see the reaction of their users fully but, the initial reaction has been very positive so far.

Well Told's brand strategy and visual identity now align giving them the ability to move forward with confidence. A rebrand is a massive undertaking and can be very stressful but, once we finished collaborating and saw the positive impact the new logo design was having it became very clear the direction we took was the best for their brand.

Their visual identity now truly embodies the idea of being "life-inspired".

With designs that reflect their passion and creativity for making exceptionally meaningful goods that allow you to tell your story.

WellTold_Beer_001

"Working with you just felt right. Your structured approach to the design process was clearly well thought out and allowed for creativity within a structure that we had confidence would result in an amazing outcome.

Collaborating together was excellent and it felt like we had an extension to our team rather than an external partner/firm just doing design work and throwing it back at us. We are thrilled with the outcome and look forward to future collaborations."

"Working with you just felt right. Your structured approach to the design process was clearly well thought out and allowed for creativity within a structure that we had confidence would result in an amazing outcome.

Collaborating together was excellent and it felt like we had an extension to our team rather than an external partner/firm just doing design work and throwing it back at us. We are thrilled with the outcome and look forward to future collaborations." - Brian Johnson, CEO

"Working with you just felt right. Your structured approach to the design process was clearly well thought out and allowed for creativity within a structure that we had confidence would result in an amazing outcome.

Collaborating together was excellent and it felt like we had an extension to our team rather than an external partner/firm just doing design work and throwing it back at us. We are thrilled with the outcome and look forward to future collaborations." - Brian Johnson CEO

Brian_Headshot_v1

Brian Johnson, CEO

Boston, Massachusetts

Ready To Rebrand Like Well Told?

Get in touch today and let's uncover your brand's unique story!

© cfowlerdesign 2019
All rights reserved.

© cfowlerdesign 2019
All rights reserved.